TYPES OF SEEDS

Heirloom Radish

Radish Harvesting Radish Seeds Radishes are pollinated by bees and will cross readily with other radishes, so you should only allow one type to flower at a time. When selecting summer radishes for seed saving, select those with the best shape, size, and color. Seeds is yellow when mature, later turning to brown. Familiar red radishes produce […]

Heirloom Rutabaga

Rutabaga Harvesting Rutabaga Seeds Store turnips or rutabagas over the winter in a cold area with high humidity or leave outside in areas with mild winters. In the spring, transplant the entire root to its original depth and they will grow in height and then flower. Seeds are mature when pods are dry. Harvest into bags as […]

Heirloom Spinach

Spinach Harvesting Spinach Seeds Spinach is wind pollinated, and difficult to maintain purity of a certain strain if there are any other varieties with 1 mile. The best thing you can do is grow only one variety at a time, and weed out any undesirable plant as they appear. Spinach is a cool weather crop and does […]

Heirloom Squash

Squash Harvesting Squash Seeds Select your most productive plants with the tastiest fruit for seed saving. Bees pollinate squashes, so they can cross with other varieties. Most winter and summer squashes cannot cross-pollinate. With winter squashes and pumpkins, the seed is ready when the fruit is fully mature. However, with summer squashes, the fruit must stay on the […]

Heirloom Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard Harvesting Swiss Chard Seeds Swiss chard’s lightweight pollen can bee carried a long way in the wind, and will cross with other members of the species, such as swiss chard. Select swiss chards that are a couple inches in diameter and dig them up before the first hard frost. Cut leafy tops to […]

Heirloom Tomato

Tomato Harvesting Tomato Seeds Tomatoes are self-pollinating, but can occasionally be cross-pollinates by insects. Grow different varieties at least 10 ft. apart. Save seed from as least 3 different plants. To harvest the seed, cut open the tomato and scoop out the seeds and pulp. Place in a bowl or jar and add some water. Let sit […]

Heirloom Turnip

Turnip Harvesting Turnip Seeds Turnips are pollinated by bees and will cross readily with other turnips, so you should only allow one type to flower at a time. When selecting summer turnips for seed saving, select those with the best shape, size, and color. Seeds is yellow when mature, later turning to brown. Familiar turnips […]

Heirloom Mustard

Mustard Harvesting Mustard Seeds Mustard is pollinated by bees. It is best to plant a dozen or more plants as a time to maintain vigor. Mustard is much like Spinach, watch for the seedstalk to bolt up. When this happens, the seeds are found in pods in the seedstalk. You can then cut the seedstalk and remove […]

Heirloom Onion

Onion Harvesting Onion Seeds Onions are often grown from sets, or small bulbs, but onions grown from seed are of better quality and less prone to disease. Onions flower and form seed in the second year of growth and are cross-pollinated by bees. To preserve the purity of a certain strain for seed saving, make sure your […]

Heirloom Parsnips

Parsnips Harvesting Parsnip Seeds Harvest Parsnip seeds as you would carrots. Parsnip seeds are harvested BIENNIALLY. Hallow Crown Parsnip has a sweet nut like flavor. Use like carrots, add to soups and stews, or steam with butter and seasonings. Can be boiled, fried or sauteed in butter. Roots may be harvested in the fall or left […]

Heirloom Peas

Peas Harvesting Peas and Seeds Peas are self-pollinating. Sugar peas don’t generally cross with snap peas. When harvesting the seed, peas must be completely ripe in order to germinate well. Let the pea pods remain on the plants until the peas are thoroughly dry and rattling inside the pods, about a month after harvesting the others for […]

Heirloom Peppers

Peppers Harvesting Pepper Seeds

Heirloom Kale

Kale Harvesting Kale Seeds Kale is pollinated by bees and can only cross-pollinate with Rutabaga. Carefully dig the whole plant up in fall and store in a cool, bed of damp soil over the winter to preserve much of their root system. Then in the spring, replant them back outside. The plant will then regrow and create […]

Heirloom Lettuce

Lettuce Harvesting Lettuce Seeds Since lettuce is self-pollinated, it will almost always “come true” from seed, making it a good choice for seed saving. You can feel comfortable planting different varieties with another crop in between. Lettuce seeds don’t harvest all at once, so monitor the bolted plants closely for a month or two. Each time you […]

Heirloom Leeks

Leeks Harvesting Leek SeedsLeeks are often grown from sets, or small bulbs, but leeks grown from seed are of better quality and less prone to disease. Leeks flower and form seed in the second year of growth and are cross-pollinated by bees. To preserve the purity of a certain strain for seed saving, make sure […]

Heirloom Melon

Melon Harvesting Melon Seeds Bees pollinate melons and they can cross-pollinate with other melon varieties but not with cucumbers or squash. If you are planning on saving the seeds, separate varieties by 200 ft. Select early bearing, disease resistant plants for seed saving. When harvesting, scoop out seeds, thoroughly rinse off any pulp sticking to them, and air-dry […]

Heirloom Carrots

Carrots Harvesting Carrot SeedsCarrots are pollinated by insects and will cross with many other varieties of the same species. They can also cross with the very common roadside weed Queen Anne’s Lace; so if you are collecting see, mow any weedy areas before your carrots bloom. Try to keep seed carrots separated from other varieties by 1000 […]

Heirloom Corn

Corn Harvesting Corn Seeds All kinds of corn will readily cross with each other because they are wind pollinated. Plant different kinds at least 250ft. apart. Harvest seeds about 1 month after picking the rest for eating. The seeds will continue to ripen on the cobs after harvest; simply peel back the husks, tie the ears […]

Heirloom Cucumber

Cucumber Harvesting Cucumber Seeds Bees pollinate cucumbers and they will cross-pollinate with other cucumber varieties. It you’re planning on saving seed, separate varieties of cucumbers by at least 200 ft. They will not cross with melons or squash. Harvest the seed about 5 weeks after you would have eaten the fruit, when the fruit is yellowing and […]

Heirloom Eggplant

Eggplant Harvesting Eggplant Seeds Eggplant is usually self-pollinated, but may also be cross-pollinated by insects. If you’re concerned about cross-pollination grow only one type a year. Harvest the seed by cutting open it lengthwise, scoop out the pulp, and place in a bowl of water. Work it with your fingers until the viable seeds settle to […]

Heirloom Beets

Beets Harvesting Beet SeedsBeets have a lightweight pollen that bees can carry a long way in the wind, and will cross with other members of the species, such as swiss chard. Select beets that are a couple inches in diameter and dig them up before the first hard frost. Cut leafy tops to 1 in. Bury beets […]

Heirloom Broccoli

Broccoli Harvesting Broccoli Seeds Since broccoli is not self-pollinated but is cross-pollinated by insects, you’ll need at least 3 plants, placed close together, for a good set. It will cross with other brassicas such as brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, and kohlrabi, so you should either raise only one of these each year or keep them well […]

Heirloom Brussel Sprouts

Brussel Sprouts Harvesting Brussel SproutsAn insect pollinated biennial, brussel sprouts will cross with all members of Brassica family. Isolation distances of ½ mile are necessary for purity. Seedpods must reach maturity on the mother plant. When pods are dry and brown, they can be harvested and broken open.   Long Island By far the most popular of […]

Heirloom Cabbage

Cabbage Harvesting Cabbage Seeds If you are planning on saving seeds from cabbage, keep them separated from all Brassica (Broccoli, brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, and cauliflower). Separate by 200 ft. or place a tall barrier between. IN the first year, select disease-resistant plants with firm, table-ready heads. Pull up rots intact, trim off outermost leaves, and store plants […]

Heirloom Beans

Beans Harvesting Bean SeedsBeans are self-pollinating although they can rarely cross from insects so it’s best to plant different varieties 100ft. apart if at all possible. Harvest the seed about 6 weeks after you’ve harvested your beans for eating, the seed is usually ripe if it rattles in the pod, the pods are brown and dry. Pull […]

Heirloom Anise- Annual

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Anise- AnnualPlant anise herb seeds in a nice sunny spot in soil that has adequate drainage. Anise seeds produce a pungent flavored herb that resembles fennel and licorice, and it is used for both medicinal and culinary purposes. In antiquity, anise was […]

Heirloom Borage- Annual

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Borage- AnnualThe fresh herb has a cucumber-like fragrance. It has long been grown freely in kitchen gardens, both for its uses as a herb and for the sake of its flowers, which yield excellent honey. Our great grandmothers preserved […]

Heirloom Caraway- Biannual

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Caraway- BiannualFor best results, caraway seeds should be planted in dry, well-drained soil. The seed is a versatile culinary herb that is commonly used in breads – particularly rye bread, and also occasionally to flavor cheeses such as havarti. It […]

Heirloom Chamomile- Annual

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Chamomile- AnnualBesides being a favorite evening herbal tea, dried chamomile flowers in a simple muslin bag make a wonderful, relaxing bath. It is an excellent remedy for all manner of women’s disorders and is especially valuable for problems arising from […]

Heirloom Echinacea- Perennial

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds) Echinacea- Perennial “Purple Coneflower” or “Echinacea” is one of the most famous and familiar of all North American native wildflowers. Bold and beautiful, the Echinacea plant is prized equally it seems for its healing herbal qualities as […]

Heirloom Fennel- Perennial

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Fennel- Perennial Fennel is an excellent herbal additive to many culinary dishes, including salads, fish, and sauces. Fennel has through history been considered an appetite depressant, and as such, a weight loss aid.  All parts of the Fennel plant are […]

Heirloom Fenugreek- Annual

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Fenugreek- Annual Fenugreek is also sometimes called “fenigreek” – is a highly versatile herb variety that is prized for its culinary and medicinal attributes. Use fenugreek to spice up just about any meal – particularly Mediterranean dishes. Among Fenugreek’s many […]

Heirloom Lavender- Perennial

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)strong>Lavender- Perennial Of all the scores of different lavenders, this one – Lavandula vera– is arguably the most popular. A delicate and versatile variety, lavender is especially cherished for its elegant appearance and lovely scent. This lavender is fast-growing, long-blooming, […]

Heirloom Lemon Balm- Perennial

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)Lemon Balm- Perennial A perennial herb in the mint family. The leaves have a gentle lemon scent, related to mint. At the end of the summer, little white flowers full of nectar appear. These attract bees, hence the genus […]

Sorrel

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch sorrel seeds)strong>SorrelSorrel grows and looks a lot like Arugula. This difference is that it is used as a herb medicinally in soups, tea, or any foods you desire. It is high in iron and fiber. Harvesting Sorrel Seeds Small […]

St. John’s Wort- Perennial

Medicinal Herbs (Tip: Use a paper or plastic bag and rubber band over drying blooms to catch seeds)St. John’s Wort- Perennial A pretty evergreen with yellow flowers. St John’s wort is today most widely known as an herbal treatment for major and minor depression. The aerial parts of the plant can be cut and dried for […]
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